Class of 2025 Early Decision Notification Dates

Almost all the colleges have announced their early action, early decision, and regular deadlines. In this post, we will look at the Early Decision Notification Dates for the Class of 2025.

It’s a no-brainer that college admission this year is going to be extremely competitive. Choosing to apply in the early rounds is always a major decision, particularly if students opt for a binding process such as Early Decision. Many colleges have temporarily moved to test-optional admissions due to SAT/ACT cancellations, while others have extended their deadlines to give applicants more time to compile their applications.

Read Early Admission Rates for Class of 2025.

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Class of 2025 Early Decision Notification Dates

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CollegeEA/ED Notification Date
Amherst CollegeDec 15
Babson CollegeMid-Dec (ED) / Jan 1 (EA)
Barnard CollegeMid-December
Bates CollegeDec 20
Boston CollegeDec 25
Boston UniversityDec 15
Brandeis UniversityDec 15
Brown UniversityMid-December
Cal TechMid-December
Carnegie Mellon UniversityDec 15
Columbia UniversityMid-December
Cooper UnionLate December
Cornell UniversityMid-December
Dartmouth CollegeMid-December
Davidson CollegeLate December
Duke UniversityDec 15
Emory UniversityDec 15
Georgetown UniversityDec 15
GeorgiaTechMid-January (EA 2)
Hamilton CollegeDec 15
Harvard UniversityMid-December
Harvey Mudd CollegeDec 15
Johns Hopkins UniversityDec 11 (EA-I) and Feb 12 (EA-II)
Middlebury CollegeMid-Dec (EA-I) and Mid-Feb (EA-II)
MITMid-December
Mount Holyoke CollegeLate Dec (ED-I) and Late Jan (ED-II)
New York University (NYU)Dec 15 (ED-I) and Feb 15 (ED-II)
Northeastern UniversityDec 15 (ED) / Feb 1 (EA)
Northwestern UniversityMid-December
Pomona CollegeDec 15 (ED I) and Feb 15 (ED II)
Princeton UniversityApr 1
Purdue UniversityJan 15
Rice UniversityMid-December
Rutgers UniversityFeb 15
Santa Clara UniversityTBD
Stanford UniversityDec 15
Swarthmore UniversityDec 15
Tufts UniversityMid-December (ED I) and Mid-February (ED II)
University of ChicagoMid-December
University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignMid-Feb
University of MichiganLate January
University of Notre DameMid-December
University of PennsylvaniaMid-December
University of San FranciscoMid-December
University of Texas at AustinBy Feb 1
University of VirginiaMid-December
University of WisconsinBy Jan 31
Vanderbilt UniversityDec 15 (ED I) and Feb 15 (ED II)
Villanova UniversityDec 15 (ED I), Jan 15 (EA) and Mar 1 (ED II)
Virginia TechDec 15
Washington University in St. LouisDec 15
Wellesley CollegeMid-Dec
Wesleyan UniversityMid-December
William & MaryEarly December
Williams CollegeMid-December
Worcester Polytechnic InstituteDec 15
Yale UniversityMid Dec

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So, what’s the point in applying early?

Well, applying early (ED or EA) does increase your admission chances by 200 – 400%. Additionally, it siginificantly improves your financial aid package too.

Early Decision Notification Dates - Class of 2025

For example, at George Washington University, around 94% of applicants with need receive financial aid.

So, isn’t it wise to apply early?

But, what should be your strategy for EA/ED applications?

Keep reading!

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Early Action and Early Decision Application Strategies

Early Decision (ED) I

Applying in ED I round is the most compelling way for applicants to demonstrate their interest in a top-choice school because an ED acceptance is binding. It means that students agree that if they are accepted they will enroll. 

The acceptance rates in the early round are usually higher compared to the regular admission round. However, the applicant pool is considerably more competitive. High schoolers can only apply to one school ED. Students who apply ED should have excellent grades, test scores, and complete and compelling applications. 

Early Action (EA) or Single Choice or Restricted Early Action (SCEA)

If you’re a strong student and ready to apply early but don’t want the commitment of an ED option – consider applying EA or SCEA.

The EA or SCEA round is a good choice for the applicants who wish to leverage their legacy status in order to have the best chance of admission without the commitment of an ED decision.

While applying EA or SCEA, students will usually receive their decisions in mid-December. But, there are some restrictions about where else students can apply. If applying EA, students can still apply Regular Decision or EA to other institutions, but SCEA students can only apply Regular Decision to other institutions; they must wait until they get their SCEA decision before applying EA or EDII elsewhere unless it’s a public university.

It’s wise for students with strong grades, test scores, and compelling applications to apply to their top-choice schools EA if possible, while also continuing to work on Regular Decision applications. Students applying EA or SCEA can be deferred or denied, leaving open the possibility of applying ED II to another top-choice university if they decide the EA or SCEA school is no longer the best option for them.

Related Articles:

Early Decision vs Early Action: Pros and Cons

Applying Early Decision or Early Action: 4 Application Strategies to Consider by IvyWise

Early Decision (ED) II

Maybe you have a top-choice school in mind but you’re not quite ready to apply in the ED I round with the November deadline. Maybe you applied ED or EA to your top-choice school and you were deferred or denied, or you were accepted to your EA school but now you’re not sure if it’s right for you and you want to pursue your ED chances at another institution that offers a later ED II deadline.

ED II, while still competitive, offers another chance for students to demonstrate their interest and commitment to a college albeit with a later application deadline, usually in early-January or mid-February.

ED II is a great strategy for students who are compelling applicants, but maybe need a little more time to get their applications in tip-top shape. ED II can also help students leverage special circumstances like legacy status to have the best chance of admission without worrying about applying by an earlier deadline.

The ED II application strategy can be used as a first pass at an ED round, or as a second option should students’ other ED or EA application strategies not work out in their favor. Again, ED II is binding, so students should work with their college admission counselors to make sure this application option is the best option for their goals and can help them have the best chance of admission.

Tips for EA/ED Applicants

  • Take full advantage of Early Action for all the schools on your list
  • Apply Restrictive Early Action to your top school or when the restrictions don’t inhibit your ability to take advantage of early admission programs at higher ranked schools
  • Apply Early Decision I when you are strongly committed to attending your top choice school and have no concerns about affordability
  • Apply Early Decision II if you have been denied admission to your top choice school, you’re strongly committed to attending this ED II school as your next best option and have no concerns about affordability

Tips for ED Applicants

  • Apply early (usually in November) to the first-choice college
  • Receive an admission decision from the college well in advance of the usual notification date (usually by December)
  • Agree to attend the college if accepted and offered a financial aid package that is considered adequate by the family
  • May only apply to one college for early decision
  • May apply to other colleges under regular admission
  • Must withdraw all other applications when accepted by ED
  • Usually must give a nonrefundable deposit well in advance of May 1

Tips for EA & RE applicants

  • Apply early
  • Receive an admission decision early in the admission cycle (usually in January or February)
  • Do not have to commit to an EA or REA college
  • May apply to other colleges under regular admission plans
  • Must give the college a decision no later than the May 1 national response date

Who should apply early?

Applying to an ED or EA plan is most appropriate for a student who:

  • Has researched colleges extensively
  • Is absolutely sure that the college she is applying to early is the first choice
  • Has found a school that is a strong match academically, socially, geographically, and so forth
  • Meets or exceeds the admission profile for the school for SAT scores, GPA, and class rank
  • Has an academic record that has been consistently solid over time

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Good luck with your applications!!!

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Tanmoy Ray
I am a Career Adviser & Admission Consultant. Additionally, I also manage Operations at Stoodnt. I did my Masters from the UK (Aston University) and have worked at the University of Oxford (UK), Utrecht University (Netherlands), University of New South Wales (Australia) and MeetUniversity (India).
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