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M.S

Should I apply for master’s in engineering or any other area in U.S.?

Applying for graduate studies depends if you want to gain more knowledge in a specific field or are interested in getting specialization in a certain subject. Undergraduate studies gives you breadth and graduate studies provides you depth in a few areas. Knowledge is power and getting more knowledge is always a good thing.

Does getting a M.S. degree from a U.S. college better than other countries?

Many countries in the world have a great education system, but very few come close to U.S. when you look the the graduate programs and degrees especially in areas of engineering, science and technology. The reason is most of the graduate research programs and chair positions of teaching gurus is funded by private organizations, govt grants etc. This funding is what provides a robust platform for researchers, graduate students and professors to do carry out research on new topics, emerging areas of innovation and next generation of work. This is why hundreds of thousands of international students have been coming to U.S. for graduate studies in engineering and science for years and will continue doing so.

I have many friends and family members who have gone to U.S. for M.S. in Engineering? I have done my undergraduate in commerce and arts, should I still look at graduate programs in U.S.?

U.S. offers excellent graduate programs in all areas of studies whether it is engineering, science, medicine, business or arts. There are hundreds of good schools in each area. Key for each student is to think why they want to pursue a graduate program as it is 2-3 years of additional studying time, more expenses and missing out on getting experience on the job. If it is about changing into a new field or gaining specialization, definitely worth it.

How easy it is to get financial aid or assistantship for the graduate program?

You are more likely to get aid, financial assistantship or teaching assistantship for graduate programs compared to undergraduate programs. If you are applying for a joint M.S./Ph.D., likelihood of the financial help goes up. Since research assistantships are mostly funded by research grants, some colleges and certain programs have more assistantships than other. It is good to look at the data as you apply. Many times students are able to find some financial help once they enroll and speak with professors from different areas. Areas such as Virtual reality, Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, biotech, biomedical sciences etc. would definitely see continued funding of research programs in the future.

How can I make my application stand out for master’s program?

To be successful in your application, you need to make sure you have strong grades, good scores on standardized tests like GRE, TOEFL and strong recommendations from professors from your college. If there are any professors who are well known or have worked with their U.S. counterparts, have them write a personal email on your behalf supporting your application. Secondly, doing extra projects, summer internships etc. during your undergraduate years in your area of interest will help strengthen your application and chances of admission. It does not harm to look at various professor profiles in your area of interest, read about their research and ongoing projects, and reaching out to them on your ideas and interest helps. A strong statement of purpose bringing together your background, interest and ideas become a differentiator.

If I don’t get into the top university, should I still go forward with the admissions?

U.S. has hundreds of great universities to choose from. Some of them are good in certain programs while others may be better in other areas. You definitely don't want to just go for any university (be careful as there are a lot of sham universities attracting international students to join and pay fees) as it may become a challenge finding financial aid during your graduate years and finding a job after graduation.

Does Master’s degree help me in getting jobs after graduation?

Master's or graduate degree in a growth and high demand area always helps in getting a higher paying job after graduation, especially in areas of science, technology, engineering and medicine. With the growth of technology, information services, biotechnology, biomedical sciences and with the U.S. companies being at the forefront of these next generation technology, U.S. offers the best option for students interested in studying abroad, getting good educational experience and future prospect of a interesting and good paying job.

Does having a Master’s help in your career overall?

Graduate degree does give you an edge in your career, if you are an engineer, scientist, researcher or working in an specialized area that requires deeper knowledge of the subject. However, anyone without a graduate degree can be as successful as anyone else. Educational degrees are important but a successful career involves a number of things, including hard work, teamwork, having a vision and managing relationships in a corporate environment, not to mention your luck also.

How easy is it to find a job on campus to support myself if I don’t get financial aid?

Every university has a number of part-time jobs on-campus such as research assistants in labs, research projects, teaching assistants, part-time jobs in the university cafeteria, office jobs, technical lab support positions and many other support jobs. There is no guarantee of the jobs as U.S. students get priority, but international students do find ways to support themselves through different opportunities if they are willing to work hard and manage number of things at the same time. Other than the research and teaching assistantships, you do not get a job until you are on-campus.

How should I decide on the university to apply to?

Based on your interest, area of graduate study specialization, you should decide on a list of 10-15 universities as a shortlist. 4-5 of the universities should be aspirational, 4-5 universities with good chance of admission and aid and a few of them as backup. Once you have the list ready, start contacting professors, alumni etc. from the university or even engage with a counselor to get more insights on which ones to finally apply. Maybe 6-8 university applications can be a good list to go with and you can even stagger the applications to manage the whole process. Check out our college search page https://www.stoodnt.com/find-a-college to identify the universities.

How do I decide what university to join after getting admissions to a few universities?

This is a very interesting question and does not have a clear cut answer. There are a number of factors that influence your decision. Number of things you need to consider are 1) Universities overall reputation 2) Programs reputation and opportunity to do good research 3) College location 4) Financial Aid or opportunity to get one i.e. how much funding does college have or get 5) Cost of living 6) Weather 7) Security and safety or where the college campus is located 8) How easy it is for you to engage with local companies for internships or jobs post graduation 9) International student population.

Should I apply for joint M.S./Ph.D. degree?

If you have interest of doing Ph.D., definitely look into the option for applying to the join program if the university offers it. Many professors provide financial aid to students who are interested in pursuing Ph.D. as they can work on the research projects longer and get them to a meaningful milestone. Even if you apply to the joint program, you can always decide to just finish one and go work in a company with your professor's support.

Can I succeed in the graduate program or is it very competitive?

Graduate programs are definitely competitive and expectations are higher from the faculty and department. However, there is always flexibility in the system for the student to pace the coursework and decide what classes they want to take once they have enrolled. Moreover the U.S. education system focuses on flexibility, innovation and student's self-participation, something that helps students coming from International countries and tends to bring the best out of them.

What should I focus on in my personal statement?

For graduate studies, your personal statement has to address a few areas strongly 1) Why do you want to pursue that particular area of specialization 2) Do you bring any additional experience and knowledge to add value to the class learning or professor's research 3) How you want to leverage this graduate experience and degree to further the betterment of society.

I need a Research Assistantship – how do I go about getting that?

Many professors in the US have grants from the public (government0 and private sector to pursue research in their area of interest. The professors use these grants to hire research assistants to help them out with the research work. If you have an area of interest (e.g. your Bachelor's thesis or summer internship in a related field) then it might be a good idea to find out who are the prominent leaders in that area (you probably already know that if you are interested in that field) and reach out directly to that faculty. Don't be afraid to toot your own horn about the work you have done!

I have been granted a Fellowship from a US University. Will the fellowship $s be enough to cover my living and tuition cost

Typically, the Fellowship is good enough to cover tuition and living expenses.

What are typical living expenses like in the US?

This really varies from state to state and your habits. California and New York can be very expensive. One should factor in roughly $15K-$20K per year for living (housing, meals, others) expenses. You can save some money by living off- campus, because that tends to be cheaper. Living expenses in other areas could be roughly 30% to 50% cheaper. If you intend keeping a car, that could add substantially to the costs.

I want some experience after my Masters – Is the job situation in US good? What about visa sponsorships?

Jobs after a Masters degree are not easy to come by. Your best bet will be the Career Center in the university you intend going to. Check out the companies that are coming for on-campus interviews. Make sure to attend presentations and establish a connection with the company representative. Understand to what extent the company will sponsor you on an international passport.

I have admission in a reputed MS program ? Should I go for MBA instead?

Really depends on your interests. If your main interest is in pursuing a career in a non-tech area like finance, M&A, strategy or related business focus areas, then MBA is your best choice (don't even bother to get an MS). If you are really like technology and want to pursue a career in product development, product management, innovation or other areas where tech expertise is needed then your best bet is a MS. If you are like many other students, you may end up first with an MS and then get some experience, and then get your MBA. Take a hard look at where your heart is and then follow that path.

I have heard the academic load is pretty intense in a Master’s program – is that right?

Yes, that is right. More so for a MS in Engineering or other technical areas. Masters programs in the US definitely require that the foundational skills that you have acquired in your Bachelor's program be strong. The programs are rigorous and take you to the next level of learning - some often leading to PhD. So, be prepared for a fun but tough ride.

How easy it is get a student visa if I get admitted to graduate program?

If you are going for studies for engineering and science graduate program in U.S., it is easier to get a visa compared to other programs. U.S. has been a leader in the area of science and technology and they want to keep their leadership position intact. Research being done at various universities is critical to this leadership, hence U.S. wants the best and brightest from all over the world to come to their college and take part in building the future, finding new things and innovating.

My child is interested in attending college overseas. What factors should I consider when suggesting he or she look at a particular country?

There are many factors to take into account when thinking about which country your child should consider for college. You should consider a combination of each of these factors in predicting which country and which type of college would be best for him or her and focusing efforts on that school. 1) ACADEMIC STYLE. Every country varies in dominant academic and teaching styles. As an example, let’s compare the U.S. with the U.K - two countries that have among the best university systems in the world. The U.K. tends to be more hands-off when it comes to assisting individual college students in class. Typically, classes tend to be larger and more lecture-style and lecturers are less involved in interacting with students both in and outside of class. In comparison, the U.S. tends to have smaller class sizes, more emphasis on participation in class and more in-depth interaction of students with teachers or lecturers. Additionally, consider grading rubric to judge student performance. The U.S. tends to emphasise essays as a method of performance review whereas in classes in the U.K. Please consider that exceptions exist within this framework depending on the subjects studied and the size of the institution the student is attending (see the question below on determining which U.S. college is best for your child). 2) CULTURE (Including LANGUAGE). Some cultures do more to mimic the home country a student is coming from. Additionally, some areas - specifically urban areas - are more culturally diverse than others and may even offer a student access to amenities from his/her home country. For example, large cities in Canada, the UK and the US - including cities like Vancouver, Toronto, New York, London, San Francisco, Chicago and Boston - have a large number of universities as well as a large number of ethnic groups. The cultural diversity in these cities means that students from nearly any background may be able to find access to food products and other amenities that remind the student of home. Don’t forget that weather can be a large consideration as well! If you’re from southern India and you’re looking at schools with your child up in Canada, the UK and parts of the US (the northern Midwest or New England), he is going to need to bring winter weather gear and be prepared to take vitamins to supplement Vitamin D (since the sun will be mostly absent for about 5 months a year!). 1) It should be noted that if your child is considering going to college in a country where the native language is not English - including France, Germany and Switzerland - he/she should be prepared to deal with the additional challenges of assimilation. This means he/she should have a plan for acquiring the linguistic skills necessary not only to excel in the classroom but to fit in socially. This is something that will be part of the admissions process and is typically needed in order to obtain a Visa. Which brings us to the next point… 3) LIFE OUTSIDE OF THE CLASSROOM. Along the same line of thinking as culture, parents should discuss life outside of the classroom with their child during the application process. Far too often, this is a last-minute consideration for families when it should be among the first considerations. The reason is this: If a child is unable to adjust socially, is depressed or unhappy in the setting in which he/she moves to go to college, he/she will be more likely to do poorly academically or not graduate. Don’t set your child up for failure; think through what environment and social context he/she would be most likely to thrive in. For example, if you come from a religious or cultural background where alcohol is prohibited, think twice before suggesting your child go study in a cultural context where social life is entered around alcohol and there are few other viable social outlets that would be of interest to your child. Some further points to consider: Is the college in an urban or rural environment? How is the system of socializing set up in that particular country and/or state? Does it tend to be more centered around a team-oriented culture or more individualistic in nature? 4) FINANCIAL SUPPORT. Each country has a different scheme of how it charges international students. While international student fees are typically always more than students from that country, each college has different fees from neighbouring colleges - and most importantly, each country and college has different opportunities for funding and scholarship. If you are coming from a country where funding may be an issue for your family, it is essential that you understand what scholarships you may be eligible for. For more information on funding for U.S. colleges, please see the question to this effect listed below. 5) POTENTIAL FOR ADMISSION. Depending on rank within the country and the number of international applicants at that college, each university has a different caliber for admission. Some universities may be easier for applicants from a certain country to be admitted to because they may be less popular for locals from that particular nation and thus less competitive. The importance here is to help your daughter broaden her search for a college. There may be colleges with scholarship potential and high academic rankings that you have not considered simply because these are not popularly known about in the country form which you come. Great! Use this to your advantage. Think smart and strategic - not simply in the same path as your neighbours. If you have questions about any of the points listed above, please speak in more depth with your Counsellor about them.

What should I do to give my child the best chance at success in being accepted?

1. Talk extensively with your daughter or son. 2. Consult a Stoodnt counsellor to work through the admissions process. 3. Along with your counsellor, come up with a careful list of choices in places where your child would thrive. Make sure she diversifies her choices of school. 4. Work closely with your child and counsellor on her application strategy, interview and any other application components. If you take these steps, you can help to ensure that your child will get accepted to an overseas institution. The trick is do this smartly as possible to also make sure that your child has the financial support that will be necessary for his/her Visa. This is especially important if you cannot self-fund your child for all four years. It will then be even more important that he/she obtains a scholarship to study or does extensive research to go to a college with a very low cost.

M.B.A

Should I pursue M.B.A. after completing my undergraduate degree?

It is advisable to pursue M.B.A. after maybe 2-3 years of work experience. Once you start working, you may have a better idea on how M.B.A. can help your career or skills. Secondly, good schools prefer students with experience in their class as it helps in overall learning environment .

What are some good schools in US for M.B.A.?

There are number of great schools in US offering M.B.A. degree to students. However, it is beneficial to focus on top M.B.A. programs for admission i.e. top 20-30 colleges, unless you are doing M.B.A. part-time and pursuing it to gain expertise in some area.

Is there a big difference between the top M.B.A. schools in US?

All the top M.B.A. schools in U.S. have a lot to offer to students, but each school is known for area of specialization. For example, Harvard is not only known for its global brand, case studies but also a strong general management, leadership programs. Stanford being in silicon valley offers students opportunity to work in technology industry and entrepreneurship, something MIT business program is known for too. Wharton, Columbia and University of Chicago have strong finance programs and Kellogg is well known for Marketing program.

Do M.B.A. programs in US provide financial aid?

Most of the M.B.A. programs in general do not offer financial aid, especially to international students. Students can take loans, get some financial aid if you are a U.S. citizen or get sponsorship from their company.

How easy it is to get a job after the M.B.A. program?

If you graduate from a good M.B.A. school, it is definitely easy to get a job at a good company (management consulting, investment banking, global brands etc.).

Is M.B.A. worth it?

Totally depends…if you are looking at doing a M.B.A. from a top business school, it is totally worth it. You not only have the opportunity to meet classmates from all over the world, learn from each other, learn from a group of experienced, well known professors, but you also build relationships with a set of classmates you can count on for rest of your life. If you get into a good M.B.A. program, but not one of the top colleges, think hard on why you want to go for a M.B.A. If your answer is centers around building skills, knowledge, expertise in an area that complements your existing expertise, it is worth it. If the answer is it may help you in your career, you can get that with hard work, perseverance and good performance on your current job.

Does a M.B.A. help in your career?

M.B.A. may help you switch into a new area and may provide you a good springboard, but success in your career depends on how you perform at your job, how well you can build relationships and how much risk are you willing to take, not to mention "being at the right place at the right time i.e. luck".

How should I prepare for my interview?

Be your self in the interview for M.B.A. program.

Most of the M.B.A. schools have essays as part of application. How important are these essays?

Essays play a very important role in your overall application. All of the top business schools in U.S. are very competitive with thousands of applicants applying for a few hundred open seats. All of the applicants have strong academic achievements, good work experience and recommendations. As a applicant, you have to definitely meet the academic, numeric standards of the school requirements. Essays are a way for a candidate to differentiate themselves and tell a story on why a college should admit you instead of another candidate. Most of these colleges are looking to balance the class with students from all over the world, who can bring diverse background, perspective to discussions and who can become future leaders, managers and entrepreneurs.

What is a good essay for a M.B.A. program?

A good essay for M.B.A. should cover the following areas 1) How does your experience, interests and future aspirations fit with school's program and how the school helps you in achieving them 2) Why is your candidacy unique, what can you offer to your class and why school should admit you instead of another student with similar academic achievement 3) Why this particular college and not any other college. 4) A good packaging of your overall story. Check out our webinar and videos to learn more on essay topics

Do International students live on-campus or off campus?

In the first year it is recommended to live on campus so you can easily manage a hectic workload and get to know your classmates. If you already live in the same city and have a place to stay and a car to commute, you can continue staying off campus. During the second year, one can decide if they want to continue living on campus or want to move out and live in a apartment.

Is there a set number of International students each M.B.A. program admits each year?

Most of the schools have a directional number on the class distribution i.e. men, women, international, engineers, consultants, investment bankers etc. However the numbers can vary based on application pool and competitiveness of pool. Over the last few years given the globalization trends, schools are increasing size of international admissions. International students have a lot to offer to these schools and applicants should try to bring it forth in the applications.

As a International student, how do I differentiate in my application for M.B.A.?

Focus on your unique story and value you bring to the school, class and your fellow students as a International student. M.B.A. programs are focused on creating a balanced learning environment and creating next generation leaders, key is how you fit in that puzzle and how you help the program be successful in its goal.

How easy it is to get a student visa for M.B.A. program?

U.S. visa policy is pretty much set at a higher level and is dictated by country's need to attract talent that can be part of country's future aspirations and growth. The numbers of students from each country changes each year, but not dramatically. If you get into a good M.B.A. program, chances of getting a visa is high as it proves your academic achievement and what you can offer the country and its colleges.

I am interested in studying abroad for my M.B.A. Should I do my M.B.A. from U.S., Europe or Asia?

All geographies have a few excellent M.B.A. programs, but no geography comes close to what U.S. has to offer to students. There are many number of good schools, excellent programs and good opportunities for students once they graduate. If one can get into a good M.B.A. school in US, recommend pursuing M.B.A. in U.S. compared to other countries.

Does your job experience help in M.B.A. admission?

Many top M.B.A. programs require an applicant to have job experience before applying to the school. Main reason is the schools believe student has a lot to offer in the learning environment if they have some on job experience. Schools do look at your company experience, company brand name and recommendations from leaders, managers at your company in evaluating your application

Should I participate in community service to strengthen my M.B.A. application profile?

Most of the students think they cannot get into a top school M.B.A. without showing some community service work. Being involved in community service does reflect on your leadership and giving back, however don't do it unless you are passionate about the cause and believe in it. Nowadays every applicant has community service as part of their experience, profile and many colleges do not know what to make of it. Again, community service is always a noble cause and do it, but not just to beef up your M.B.A. application.

My child is interested in attending college overseas. What factors should I consider when suggesting he or she look at a particular country?

There are many factors to take into account when thinking about which country your child should consider for college. You should consider a combination of each of these factors in predicting which country and which type of college would be best for him or her and focusing efforts on that school. 1) ACADEMIC STYLE. Every country varies in dominant academic and teaching styles. As an example, let’s compare the U.S. with the U.K - two countries that have among the best university systems in the world. The U.K. tends to be more hands-off when it comes to assisting individual college students in class. Typically, classes tend to be larger and more lecture-style and lecturers are less involved in interacting with students both in and outside of class. In comparison, the U.S. tends to have smaller class sizes, more emphasis on participation in class and more in-depth interaction of students with teachers or lecturers. Additionally, consider grading rubric to judge student performance. The U.S. tends to emphasise essays as a method of performance review whereas in classes in the U.K. Please consider that exceptions exist within this framework depending on the subjects studied and the size of the institution the student is attending (see the question below on determining which U.S. college is best for your child). 2) CULTURE (Including LANGUAGE). Some cultures do more to mimic the home country a student is coming from. Additionally, some areas - specifically urban areas - are more culturally diverse than others and may even offer a student access to amenities from his/her home country. For example, large cities in Canada, the UK and the US - including cities like Vancouver, Toronto, New York, London, San Francisco, Chicago and Boston - have a large number of universities as well as a large number of ethnic groups. The cultural diversity in these cities means that students from nearly any background may be able to find access to food products and other amenities that remind the student of home. Don’t forget that weather can be a large consideration as well! If you’re from southern India and you’re looking at schools with your child up in Canada, the UK and parts of the US (the northern Midwest or New England), he is going to need to bring winter weather gear and be prepared to take vitamins to supplement Vitamin D (since the sun will be mostly absent for about 5 months a year!). 1) It should be noted that if your child is considering going to college in a country where the native language is not English - including France, Germany and Switzerland - he/she should be prepared to deal with the additional challenges of assimilation. This means he/she should have a plan for acquiring the linguistic skills necessary not only to excel in the classroom but to fit in socially. This is something that will be part of the admissions process and is typically needed in order to obtain a Visa. Which brings us to the next point… 3) LIFE OUTSIDE OF THE CLASSROOM. Along the same line of thinking as culture, parents should discuss life outside of the classroom with their child during the application process. Far too often, this is a last-minute consideration for families when it should be among the first considerations. The reason is this: If a child is unable to adjust socially, is depressed or unhappy in the setting in which he/she moves to go to college, he/she will be more likely to do poorly academically or not graduate. Don’t set your child up for failure; think through what environment and social context he/she would be most likely to thrive in. For example, if you come from a religious or cultural background where alcohol is prohibited, think twice before suggesting your child go study in a cultural context where social life is entered around alcohol and there are few other viable social outlets that would be of interest to your child. Some further points to consider: Is the college in an urban or rural environment? How is the system of socializing set up in that particular country and/or state? Does it tend to be more centered around a team-oriented culture or more individualistic in nature? 4) FINANCIAL SUPPORT. Each country has a different scheme of how it charges international students. While international student fees are typically always more than students from that country, each college has different fees from neighbouring colleges - and most importantly, each country and college has different opportunities for funding and scholarship. If you are coming from a country where funding may be an issue for your family, it is essential that you understand what scholarships you may be eligible for. For more information on funding for U.S. colleges, please see the question to this effect listed below. 5) POTENTIAL FOR ADMISSION. Depending on rank within the country and the number of international applicants at that college, each university has a different caliber for admission. Some universities may be easier for applicants from a certain country to be admitted to because they may be less popular for locals from that particular nation and thus less competitive. The importance here is to help your daughter broaden her search for a college. There may be colleges with scholarship potential and high academic rankings that you have not considered simply because these are not popularly known about in the country form which you come. Great! Use this to your advantage. Think smart and strategic - not simply in the same path as your neighbours. If you have questions about any of the points listed above, please speak in more depth with your Counsellor about them.

What should I do to give my child the best chance at success in being accepted?

1. Talk extensively with your daughter or son. 2. Consult a Stoodnt counsellor to work through the admissions process. 3. Along with your counsellor, come up with a careful list of choices in places where your child would thrive. Make sure she diversifies her choices of school. 4. Work closely with your child and counsellor on her application strategy, interview and any other application components. If you take these steps, you can help to ensure that your child will get accepted to an overseas institution. The trick is do this smartly as possible to also make sure that your child has the financial support that will be necessary for his/her Visa. This is especially important if you cannot self-fund your child for all four years. It will then be even more important that he/she obtains a scholarship to study or does extensive research to go to a college with a very low cost.

Undergraduate

My child is interested in studying abroad after high-school. Where should I send him or her for college?

You have many good colleges in various countries to select from if your child is interested in going abroad. U.S. , itself, has thousands of colleges with hundreds of them offering good programs. Canada has a good number of colleges, many European countries have good, affordable colleges and so does Singapore, Hong Kong in Asia. Lately many students have been going to Australia for college education. However, if you are looking for overall experience, future opportunities and a global outlook, U.S. definitely offers more than other countries. It is getting expensive to study in U.S. but in the long term the return on your child's investment is worth it.

How easy it is to get admission into a U.S. college?

As pool of applicants increase, especially from International markets, it is getting more competitive to get into the top colleges. Most of the top schools have admit rate of 4-8%. However, U.S. has hundreds of good schools and getting into those schools is matter of choice, having good academic background and applying with rigor.

How do I decide which school I should apply to?

Your college shortlist should depend on 1) Academic Scores 2) Interests 3) College Costs 4) Future opportunities 5) College Environment 6) Other factors such as weather, security etc. Your list should have 2-3 aspirational schools, 2 schools with good chances of getting in and 2 schools that can be your backup in case you are not able to get into your top choice schools.

What do schools look for in the student application?

There are three critical things school look for in a student's application 1) Academic achievement such as G.P.A, Test Scores, AP, Courses taken etc. 2) Extracurricular achievements such as Sports, leadership, community service, internships etc. 3) Personal background and environment such as country residing, parent status, parent income group etc. You don't need to be having all the checkmarks, key is to be good in a few areas and highlight them on your application.

How should I write a good essay?

Key to writing a good essay is 1) Tell a story about yourself 2) You should be the central actor of the story 3) Don't be shy of using "I" in the story and it is you who the college is interested in admitting and not your family or friend 4) bring something unique about yourself in the story that admission officer enjoys reading and noticing.

Do I have a chance of getting admitted into a good college even if I don't have good grades in school?

Definitely your grades cannot be poor as you have to meet the minimum criteria. However, you still have chance of admission if you don't meet the average grades as you can still strengthen your application with strong extracurricular, good test scores or essays, statement of purpose that stands out.

How easy it is to get financial aid if I am an International student?

Getting financial aid is getting tougher day by day, especially for international students. If you need aid, check out all the available assistantships for international students and write to admissions office how they can help. If there are really interested in having you join the program, something may work out for you. Just remember, it never harms to ask. You just have to do so....

Do summer programs and internships help in my college application?

This question is often asked by parents all over the world. Summer programs help in number of ways 1) Helps your child experience how college will be in U.S. 2) Helps them in their learning 3) Adds to the overall application. However, if you do summer program at Harvard, it does not mean you have an edge for admissions at Harvard. Your application will be reviewed and treated just like any other application and admission decision will be taken irrespective of your summer program affiliation.

How easy it is to get accepted to study at a U.S. college?

The answer to this is very simple: it depends which college! The U.S. has more than a thousand private universities and more than 500 public universities. There are plenty of colleges with spaces open for your son or daughter. The important piece is working closely with him during this process to figure out which college would be the best fit for him. Colleges in the U.S. such as Stanford, Harvard or Princeton can have acceptance rates close to 5%. Other schools - particularly public schools - can have acceptance rates close to 100%. Of course, most colleges will fall somewhere in between these two extremes.

My child is interested in attending college overseas. What factors should I consider when suggesting he or she look at a particular country?

There are many factors to take into account when thinking about which country your child should consider for college. You should consider a combination of each of these factors in predicting which country and which type of college would be best for him or her and focusing efforts on that school. 1) ACADEMIC STYLE. Every country varies in dominant academic and teaching styles. As an example, let’s compare the U.S. with the U.K - two countries that have among the best university systems in the world. The U.K. tends to be more hands-off when it comes to assisting individual college students in class. Typically, classes tend to be larger and more lecture-style and lecturers are less involved in interacting with students both in and outside of class. In comparison, the U.S. tends to have smaller class sizes, more emphasis on participation in class and more in-depth interaction of students with teachers or lecturers. Additionally, consider grading rubric to judge student performance. The U.S. tends to emphasise essays as a method of performance review whereas in classes in the U.K. Please consider that exceptions exist within this framework depending on the subjects studied and the size of the institution the student is attending (see the question below on determining which U.S. college is best for your child). 2) CULTURE (Including LANGUAGE). Some cultures do more to mimic the home country a student is coming from. Additionally, some areas - specifically urban areas - are more culturally diverse than others and may even offer a student access to amenities from his/her home country. For example, large cities in Canada, the UK and the US - including cities like Vancouver, Toronto, New York, London, San Francisco, Chicago and Boston - have a large number of universities as well as a large number of ethnic groups. The cultural diversity in these cities means that students from nearly any background may be able to find access to food products and other amenities that remind the student of home. Don’t forget that weather can be a large consideration as well! If you’re from southern India and you’re looking at schools with your child up in Canada, the UK and parts of the US (the northern Midwest or New England), he is going to need to bring winter weather gear and be prepared to take vitamins to supplement Vitamin D (since the sun will be mostly absent for about 5 months a year!). 1) It should be noted that if your child is considering going to college in a country where the native language is not English - including France, Germany and Switzerland - he/she should be prepared to deal with the additional challenges of assimilation. This means he/she should have a plan for acquiring the linguistic skills necessary not only to excel in the classroom but to fit in socially. This is something that will be part of the admissions process and is typically needed in order to obtain a Visa. Which brings us to the next point… 3) LIFE OUTSIDE OF THE CLASSROOM. Along the same line of thinking as culture, parents should discuss life outside of the classroom with their child during the application process. Far too often, this is a last-minute consideration for families when it should be among the first considerations. The reason is this: If a child is unable to adjust socially, is depressed or unhappy in the setting in which he/she moves to go to college, he/she will be more likely to do poorly academically or not graduate. Don’t set your child up for failure; think through what environment and social context he/she would be most likely to thrive in. For example, if you come from a religious or cultural background where alcohol is prohibited, think twice before suggesting your child go study in a cultural context where social life is entered around alcohol and there are few other viable social outlets that would be of interest to your child. Some further points to consider: Is the college in an urban or rural environment? How is the system of socializing set up in that particular country and/or state? Does it tend to be more centered around a team-oriented culture or more individualistic in nature? 4) FINANCIAL SUPPORT. Each country has a different scheme of how it charges international students. While international student fees are typically always more than students from that country, each college has different fees from neighbouring colleges - and most importantly, each country and college has different opportunities for funding and scholarship. If you are coming from a country where funding may be an issue for your family, it is essential that you understand what scholarships you may be eligible for. For more information on funding for U.S. colleges, please see the question to this effect listed below. 5) POTENTIAL FOR ADMISSION. Depending on rank within the country and the number of international applicants at that college, each university has a different caliber for admission. Some universities may be easier for applicants from a certain country to be admitted to because they may be less popular for locals from that particular nation and thus less competitive. The importance here is to help your daughter broaden her search for a college. There may be colleges with scholarship potential and high academic rankings that you have not considered simply because these are not popularly known about in the country form which you come. Great! Use this to your advantage. Think smart and strategic - not simply in the same path as your neighbours. If you have questions about any of the points listed above, please speak in more depth with your Counsellor about them.

What should I do to give my child the best chance at success in being accepted?

1. Talk extensively with your daughter or son. 2. Consult a Stoodnt counsellor to work through the admissions process. 3. Along with your counsellor, come up with a careful list of choices in places where your child would thrive. Make sure she diversifies her choices of school. 4. Work closely with your child and counsellor on her application strategy, interview and any other application components. If you take these steps, you can help to ensure that your child will get accepted to an overseas institution. The trick is do this smartly as possible to also make sure that your child has the financial support that will be necessary for his/her Visa. This is especially important if you cannot self-fund your child for all four years. It will then be even more important that he/she obtains a scholarship to study or does extensive research to go to a college with a very low cost.

My child is looking to study in the U.S. But there are so many colleges, I don’t know where to start! Should my child consider a small or large school? Public or private?

In addition to the factors mentioned above in the question concerning international culture, this depends upon three main factors: 1) SUBJECT MATTER. What does your child wish to study? Forget looking at colleges based only upon popular reputation. Not every child will - and should go to Harvard! Additionally, not every child would be happy going to Harvard as an undergraduate or would thrive there. Instead, have your daughter or son begin looking at schools with solid programs in the field they wish to study. For example, let’s imagine that your daughter wants to study Engineering. Harvey Mudd is a top-notch, high-caliber engineering school that may be virtually unknown overseas. Because of its tiny size, it allows students extensive interactions with professors. Because it is private, it has the potential to offer significantly higher scholarships than public schools. While the name “Harvey Mudd” may be unknown to your neighbours, it has a very strong brand name and reputation among the right people in the field within the U.S. - particularly among experts in the field (i.e. Engineers). If your daughter gets into and attends Harvey Mudd, there is now a very strong chance of her being able to go onto graduate school at an Ivy league institution. She also may have a better experience at Harvey Mudd compared to a large public school or even an Ivy League school because she will likely have more support and will definitely have more interaction with professors than she would at a larger school. This type of approach will not only work for Engineering - it works for International Affairs, Writing, Languages, Mathematics and Statistics, Health and Medicine, etc. Don’t ask which school your child wants to go to; ask what your child wants to do afterwards and try to help them find a path to getting there in the way that will make them as happy as possible. 2) STUDENT’S PERSONALITY. 1) How independent is your child? Public universities tend to be much more bureaucratic than smaller schools. Often, the less autonomous student can easily get lost or feel disillusioned with navigating the larger school system. 2) Does your child enjoy the fast pace of city life or slower, more accessible pace of being in a suburb or rural area? Perhaps your child grew up in Shanghai or Mumbai and the fast-pace life of a city is all he knows and really enjoys. It may be best to target big cities, in this case, to give your son more of a familiar environment and outlet for social life. That being said, many students from any type of environment thrive in small, close-knit college communities such as those of small liberal arts schools. 3) What types of hobbies does your child have? While all U.S. schools have diverse student life and activities, if your son is really excited about the prospect of being nearby the ocean or learning how to surf while studying in the US, make sure he’s looking at Florida or California and doesn’t go to school in the northern Midwest. If he’s excited about getting outside and hiking some weekends, New England or Colorado may be a good choice for schools. Remember just how important it is that he be excited about something besides schoolwork so he can have a good experience and fulfil other aspirations as well. The US is more than 2,000 miles coast to coast. There are plenty of schools in significantly diverse locations; help your child look at schools that seem like they would be the right fit for him and his interests in particular. 3) FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS. As can so often happen in life, a large piece of the college admission puzzle comes down to your family’s income bracket. If you are seeking financial assistance, it is wise to target specific types of schools. 1) Small liberal arts institutions may have much higher tuition fees but they also offer much larger amounts of tuition assistance. If you are going to be in need of funding, make sure you target schools that are “need blind.” This is extremely important. This designation means that the school does NOT take a family’s finances into account during the application process. It means that the university has a policy to accept the student on his/her merits and attempt to provide funding if the student meets admissions criteria. These schools tend to be competitive but this can be an excellent way to get funding. 2) Another approach would be to target a large public university because the tuition is much larger. The State University of New York has among the lowest tuition rates of any state school network. The US News and World Reports lists the top 10 lowest rates of tuition for out of state students (including international students) and includes universities in South Dakota, North Dakota and Minnesota.

I keep hearing and reading about “small liberal arts schools.” What are these?

This is a generic term used for a particular type of U.S. college. Usually, these schools are kept small by design with student populations less than 5,000. They typically offer small courses, face to face interaction with professors. While many liberal arts schools cost much more than public schools on paper, they also offer VERY financial aid, particularly for international students. Typically, international students have wonderful experiences at these types of institutions because they emphasize community and it is much more difficult for any student - whether international or domestic - to fall between the cracks in such an institution. This means that students tend to get more support from faculty and staff members alike. Often, these schools become a second home for students and they rarely have the feeling that they are just a number in contrast to public state universities where students can graduate feeling like most professors and teachers never knew their name.

How Should I Select Schools? How Many Should I Select?

Please select your schools working with a knowledgable counselor as well as within your own desires of where you’d like to be next year. Ultimately, your list should have 2-3 “reach” schools that you’re unsure you’ll be able to get into but you’d like to try. You should have 2-3 more schools that you feel you’ll be able to manage entrance to. This means that your SAT scores and grades fall right within the range listed as a typical applicant’s range. You should have at least two schools that you feel you can definitely get into. Please note these should be schools you can actually see yourself attending. All too often, students choose the local state or country university without This is vital to the application process — you don't want to be in a situation where you haven’t gotten in anywhere The beauty of the Common App is that you can apply to many schools with minimal work!

Given what you’ve just said, is there such a thing as applying to too many schools?

Theoretically, you can apply to as many colleges as you’d like. In reality, however, remember that this is costing you both time and money. Be aware that each school has an application fee that typically runs between $50 and $100 US dollars. Colleges outside of the U.S. - including Canada and the UK and in particular, Switzerland, Germany and Austria - sometimes have no application fees. Make sure you check each application to see how much it costs to apply. Also, make sure you check to see if their is a possible fee waiver for students from a specific country or financial situation. There is sometimes a “hardship” clause that allows students applying from

I’m an International Applicant. What do you mean by the Common Application?

The Common Application (or “Common App” as it’s called) is a method to apply to many colleges at once. It allows applicants to put information into one common place - one electronic application - and to use this to apply to many schools. Please pay careful attention, however, to specific requests for information. There may be additional or different types of information asked for by one school but not by the others. For more information, please see: http://www.commonapp.org/.

What Do Schools Look For In The Student Application?

There are three critical things school look for in a student's application 1) Academic achievement such as G.P.A, Test Scores, AP, Courses taken etc. 2) Extracurricular achievements such as Sports, leadership, community service, internships etc. 3) Personal background and environment such as country residing, parent status, parent income group etc. You don't need to be having all the checkmarks, key is to be good in a few areas and highlight them on your application. How Easy It Is To Get Financial Aid If I Am An International Student? ▼ Getting financial aid is getting tougher day by day, especially for international students. If you need aid, check out all the available assistantships for international students and write to admissions office how they can help. If there are really interested in having you join the program, something may work out for you. Just remember, it never harms to ask. You just have to do so….

Do I Have A Chance Of Getting Admitted Into A Good College Even If I Don't Have Good Grades In School?

You can still get admitted to college! Good grades are not the only important part of a college application. That being said, it is obviously better to have good grades and it is best that your grades be as good as possible to demonstrate that you’re a hard worker with intellectual aptitude. An application is about more than just your grades and includes many other pieces, including your SAT, ACT and SAT subject test scores, your TOEFL scores (if you’re an international student) essays, your life story and narrative as well as your interview and the interest you’ve shown in this particular school. If you don’t have particularly good grades, is there an overall strategy you can use for college entrance? For example, if your grades aren’t that good but they are particularly good in the subject you’d like to study in college, have you highlighted this? Or is there a hobby you can emphasise that would fit in well with the school you’d like to attend. For example, if you know you’d like to go the University of Missouri but you don’t have high SAT scores or good grades but you play the tuba and would like to play in the marching band, get in touch with the conductor of the band as soon as possible. Express your interest in attending the university and playing with the band. Send a demo tape if you have one. Ensure that the conductor knows just how badly you’d like to attend the university and what a committed band member you’d be. Make sure to describe all of this in your essays and to explain why you’d like to go to the University of Missouri, in particular.

Do Summer Programs And Internships Help In My College Application?

This question is often asked by parents all over the world. Summer programs help in number of ways 1) Helps your child experience how college will be in U.S. 2) Helps them in their learning 3) Adds to the overall application. However, if you do summer program at Harvard, it does not mean you have an edge for admissions at Harvard. Your application will be reviewed and treated just like any other application and admission decision will be taken irrespective of your summer program affiliation.

What Do Schools Look For In The Student Application?

There are three critical things school look for in a student's application 1) Academic achievement such as G.P.A, Test Scores, AP, Courses taken etc. 2) Extracurricular achievements such as Sports, leadership, community service, internships etc. 3) Personal background and environment such as country residing, parent status, parent income group etc. You don't need to be having all the checkmarks, key is to be good in a few areas and highlight them on your application.